Feast of Weeks – Shavuot

Feast of Weeks – Shavuot

“From the day after the  Sabbath, the day you brought the sheaf of the wave offering (Firstfruits), count off seven full weeks.  Count off fifty days up to the day after the seventh Sabbath, and then present an offering of new grain to the Lord.  From wherever you live, bring two loaves made of two-tenths of an ephah of a fine flour, baked with yeast, as a wave offering of Firstfruits to the Lord. This is to be a lasting ordinance for the generations to come, wherever you live” (Leviticus 23:15-21).

The Feast of Weeks in Hebrew is Shavuot; in Greek it is called Pentecost. Shavuot is the ‘appointed time’ to be observed 50 days after the Feast of Firstfruits of the barley harvest as the the Firstfruits of the wheat harvest.

Fifty days after being delivered from Egypt, crossing the Red Sea, and receiving manna and living water, the Israelites arrived at Mount Sinai. Exodus 20 and 21 describe the events surrounding God descending to the top of Mount Sinai to meet with His newly formed nation. Thunder, lightning, and a thick cloud covered the mountain with a resounding shofar blast.  The people trembled with fear of dying and asked for Moses be the mediator between them and God.

When God outlined his ‘appointed times,’ this event became known as Feast of Weeks and was made as a lasting ordinance. It was also one of the three commanded pilgrimage Feasts when Jewish people from every nation were to gather in Jerusalem to worship Adonai.   As they arrived in Jerusalem at the Temple with two loaves of leavened bread for a wave offering, hundreds of thousands of Jewish people would listen as the priest read the following traditional passage from the prophet Ezekiel:

“I looked, and I saw a windstorm coming out of the north—an immense cloud with flashing lightning and surrounded by brilliant light. The center of the fire looked like glowing metal” (Ezekiel 1:4).

The Wind and Tongues of Fire

“Now there were staying in Jerusalem religious Jews from every nation under “Now there were staying in Jerusalem religious Jews from every nation under heaven. When they heard this sound, a crowd gathered; they were confused, because each one heard the believers speaking in his own language.  Totally amazed, they asked, ‘How is this possible? Aren’t all these people who are speaking from the Galilee? How is it that we hear them speaking in our native languages? We are Parthians, Medes, Elamites; residents of Mesopotamia, Judah, Cappadocia, Pontus, Asia, Phrygia, Pamphylia, Egypt, the parts of Libya near Cyrene; visitors from Rome; all Jews by birth and proselytes; Jews from Crete and from Arabia! How is it that we hear them speaking in our own languages about the great things God has done?’  Amazed and confused, they all went on asking each other, ‘What can this mean?’” (Acts 2:5-13).

Fifty days after Yeshua’s resurrection, the Feast of Weeks arrived. Jews from every nation came to Jerusalem in obedience to the commandment. This particular year, however, when the priest waved the offerings of leavened bread and they heard the words of Ezekiel, the ‘holy wind of God’ began to roar violently and, before their eyes,  a small group of 70 people had tongues of fire appear over their heads.

“The festival of Shavuot arrived, and the believers all gathered together in one place.  Suddenly there came a sound from the sky like the roar of a violent wind, and it filled the whole place where they were sitting.  Then they saw what looked like tongues of fire, which separated and came to rest on each one of them.  They were all filled with the Holy Spirit and began to talk in different languages, as the Spirit enabled them to speak” (Acts 2:1-4).

In Hebrew, Holy Spirit is Ruach haKodesh. The word ruach means ‘breath’ or ‘wind’ and the word kodesh means ‘holy.’ The ‘holy wind of God’ blew violently as He poured His Holy Spirit into the hearts of 70 men. The tongues of fire separated and came to rest on each of the disciples’ heads.  Through the ‘holy wind of God’ and His refining flaming fire, they began to speak in other languages. In Greek the word glossa is ‘tongue’ and means ‘a nation distinguished by its speech.’ As the disciples spoke, Jews from every nation heard the message of repentance in their own ‘tongue.’

Hebrew Word Pictures

Wind or Ruach – רוח

Resh ר – A Head means ‘what is most important.’

Vav ו – A Nail means ‘binding.’

Chet ח – A Fence means ‘protect.’

Holy or HaKodesh – הקודש

Hey ה – A Window means ‘behold or reveal.’

Qof ק – A Back of the Head means ‘what is final.’

Vav ו – A Nail means ‘binding.’

Dalet ד – A Door means ‘pathway.’

Shin ש – A Tooth means ‘consume.’

The complete Hebrew word picture for Ruach haKodesh: What is most important is the binding that protects; behold the final binding is the consuming pathway.

Fire or Esh – אש

Alef א – An Ox means ‘first strength.’

Shin ש – A Tooth means ‘consume.’

The Hebrew word picture for esh: The first strength consumes.

Tongues or Lashon – לשון

Lamed ל – A Shepherd’s Staff means ‘to urge forward.’

Shin ש – A Tooth means ‘consume.’
Vav ו – A Nail means ‘binding.’

Nun נ – A Fish means ‘action and life.’

The Hebrew word picture for lashon: Urge forward the consuming and binding of life.

Two millennia earlier, Ehyeh Asher Ehyeh made His holy presence known to the Israelites through wind and lightning. He revealed His holy presence through wind and fire to Ezekiel. Could it be that Adonai was again revealing His holy presence through ‘wind’ and ‘tongues of fire?’ The crowds in Jerusalem from all over the known world are hearing the impossible. They are confused and amazed. The disciples of Yeshua are speaking in each of their different languages with such perfection that they knew it was a miracle.

Peter stands up. This man who had publicly denied knowing Yeshua only seven weeks earlier stands, raises his voice, and addresses the crowd. He explains that they are witnessing the fulfillment of a prophecy of Joel and begins to testify about Yeshua of Nazareth, the Messiah of Israel.

“I will pour out my Spirit on all people. Your sons and daughters will prophesy, your old men will dream dreams, your young men will see visions. Even on my servants, both men and women, I will pour out my Spirit in those days” (Joel 2:28-29).

Pierced Hearts

“Men of Israel! Listen to this! Yeshua from Natzeret was a man demonstrated to you to have been from God by the powerful works, miracles and signs that God performed through him in your presence. You yourselves know this. This man was arrested in accordance with God’s predetermined plan and foreknowledge; and, through the agency of persons not bound by the Torah, you nailed him up on a stake and killed him! But God raised him from the dead, freeing him from the agony of death, because it was impossible for death to keep its hold on him. Therefore let all Israel be assured of this: God has made this Yeshua, whom you crucified, both Lord and Messiah” (Acts 2:22-24).

When Jews from every nation heard Peter’s testimony about Yeshua, they were “cut to the heart.” The Orthodox Jewish Bible says they were “pierced with conviction in their hearts.” The Hebrew word for ‘cut’ is b’rit, the same word used for ‘cutting a covenant.’  The Spirit of God brought not only conviction with a circumcision of their hearts, but renewed the covenant God made with Israel at Mount Sinai; the covenant they had broken.

The people ask what they need to do regarding this ‘renewed’ covenant. Peter and the apostles respond with the Hebrew word shuv, meaning ‘turn back’ or ‘return’ in the sense of making a 180 degree turn around from the direction you are heading and go a different way. It is translated into English as ‘repent.’

“Repent (change your views and purpose to accept the will of God in your inner selves instead of rejecting it) and be baptized, every one of you, in the name of Messiah Yeshua for the forgiveness of and release from your sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit” (Acts 2:29).

The men and women of Israel needed to repent from their disobedience and return to faith in God.  They needed to be immersed into the name of Yeshua for the forgiveness of their sins and receive the gift of God’s Spirit. Three thousand Jewish men and women repented and turned back to God that day. They received forgiveness of their sins and the Holy Spirit was poured into their hearts (Acts 2:41). Their hearts of stone were changed into hearts of flesh and the new covenant prophesied by Ezekiel and Jeremiah, instituted and promised by Yeshua, had begun in Jerusalem on Shavuot with Israel.

“This is the [new] covenant I will make with the House of Israel after that time,” declares the LORD. “I will put my law in their minds and write it on their hearts. I will be their God, and they will be my people…. For I will forgive their wickedness and will remember their sins no more” (Jeremiah 31:33-34).

“I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit inside you; I will take the stony heart out of your flesh and give you a heart of flesh. I will put my Spirit inside you and cause you to live by my laws, respect my rulings and obey them” (Ezekiel 36:24).

“For this is my blood, which ratifies the New Covenant, my blood shed on behalf of many, so that they may have their sins forgiven” (Matthew 26:28).

The Kingdom of Heaven

“And he [Yeshua] told them yet another parable. “The Kingdom of Heaven is like chametz that a woman took and mixed with a bushel of flour, then waited until the whole batch of dough rose” (Matthew 13:33).

Chametz or ‘soured dough’ was used for raising bread without yeast. It was always symbolic of the leavened, puffed up teachings of Israel’s leaders, yet Yeshua uses ‘soured dough’ to describe the Kingdom of Heaven in his parable. Chametz is the ingredient the woman takes and mixes with her flour to make the dough rise. When the leavened dough rose to its fullest extent, the woman  had enough dough from a single bushel of flour for a feast of leavened bread.   

The commandment for Shavuot included a grain offering along with two loaves of leavened bread made from finely ground flour. The two leavened loaves were waved before Adonai by the high priest. For millennia, as the two loaves were waved, the people hoped in the coming Messiah promised by the two witnesses of the Torah and the Prophets.

When Yeshua walked on the Road to Emmaus after his resurrection, he told the two men with him that everything in the Torah and Prophets had spoken about him. This witness of two established him as the Messiah of Israel.

Ten days after Yeshua’s ascension, the ‘holy breath’ of Ehyeh Asher Ehyeh had been worked into a small lump of dough –– 70 disciples.  From their testimony, the Jews who heard the message and were “cut to the heart.” Through the power of the Ruach haKodesh, their hearts were transformed and they became empowered witnesses of repentance, forgiveness, and redemption. They would take the good news of Yeshua back to their own countries in their own languages.  They would become the first missionaries to proclaim salvation to the Jew first (Romans 1:16).  

Within a few years, the power of God’s ‘holy breath’ would come upon the gentiles, change their hearts, and they would become part of God’s Kingdom along with Israel. As the two leavened loaves of bread were being waved by the high priest in the Temple, the Body of Messiah was born. God’s ‘holy wind’ had been poured into a small lump of dough and, like the woman’s leaven, would continue to grow and spread from them to the nations of the world until the Kingdom of God would be established by another witness of two: Jew and gentile, one in Messiah, proclaiming the good news of Yeshua (Galatians 3:28). 

Fulfilled by Yeshua

“I will ask the Father, and he will give you another advocate (Counselor, Helper, Intercessor, and Strengthener), to help you and be with you forever— the Spirit of truth. I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you. Because I live, you also will live. On that day you will realize that I am in my Father, and you are in me, and I am in you” (John 14:14-20).

Yeshua kept his promise. He ascended to his Father and asked Him to send the Counselor, the Spirit of Truth. On the ‘appointed time’ of Feast of Weeks, God poured out His Ruach haKodesh with wind and flames of fire.  Seventy disciples understood that Yeshua and his Father were One, and they were joined with them to restore the broken covenant. They were no longer fatherless, they had Adonai as their Father as Yeshua did. They were given the same authority to forgive sins as Yeshua along with the anointing power to be witnesses of his salvation to the world.

Yeshua kept his promise. He ascended to his Father and asked Him to send the Counselor, the Spirit of Truth. On the Feast of Weeks, God poured out His Ruach haKodesh with wind and flames of fire.  Seventy disciples were transformed in their hearts. They were no longer fatherless, they had Adonai as their Father as Yeshua did. They were given the same authority to forgive sins as Yeshua along with the anointing power to be witnesses of his salvation to the world. These new faithful followers of Yeshua were reborn into His Kingdom and sealed with God’s Spirit. They became the Firstfruits of the wheat harvest as Yeshua fulfilled another of his Father’s ‘appointed times.’

 For more about Yeshua fullfilling the ‘appointed times,’ purchase Yeshua in His Father’s Feasts.

©2008 Tentstake Ministries Publishing, all rights reserved.  No copying or reproducing of this article without crediting the author or Tentstake Ministries Publishing. For a hard copy of this blog post,  please purchase Journey with Jeremiah: Nourishment for the Wild Olive.

Ruth, a Foreigner in Israel

I am a Ruth.  I am blessed to be a Ruth.  I am thankful to be a Ruth.  I would not change my place in the Olive Tree of Israel as a Ruth.

Traditionally, the book of Ruth is read during the days of the omer, the days between the Firstfruits resurrection of Messiah and the pouring out of the Spirit of God at Shavuot (Pentecost), because the period of time that it occurs is during the barley harvest in Bethlehem.  Ruth gleans barley from the fields until she reaps a fruitful harvest. Her life story is like the two leavened loaves of bread that are waved by the priests at Shavuot –– the perfect illustration of the Jew (Naomi) and the non-Jew (Ruth) being brought together in the Olive Tree of Israel.

“You must bring bread from your homes for waving — two loaves made with one gallon of fine flour, baked with leaven — as firstfruits for Adonai” (Leviticus 23:17).

Ruth’s story begins in Moab where her husband, her brother-in-law, and father-in-law have all died.   Naomi, her mother-in-law, decides to return to her homeland in Judah since the famine that took her family to Moab has ended.   Ruth decides to return with her mother-in-law to Bethlehem in spite of Naomi’s discouragement.

“But Ruth replied, “Don’t urge me to leave you or to turn back from you. Where you go I will go, and where you stay I will stay. Your people will be my people and your God my God” (Ruth 1:16).

Ruth states profoundly and explicitly that Naomi’s God, the God of Israel, will be her God and Naomi’s people, the Jewish people, will be her people.  Ruth makes a conscious choice to leave behind all of her pagan Moabite gods and customs to go to Bethlehem where she will live as a foreigner in an new land with strange customs and an unfamiliar people. It is at this moment that Ruth chooses to ‘convert’ from a pagan way of life and become a God-fearer.

“When you harvest the ripe crops produced in your land, don’t harvest all the way to the corners of your field, and don’t gather the ears of grain left by the harvesters; leave them for the poor and the foreigner; I am Adonai your God” (Leviticus 23:22).

In Bethlehem, these two widows have nothing except the desire to survive.  Naomi understands the Biblical culture of her people and gives explicit instructions to Ruth about gleaning in the fields behind the workers.  Ruth follows Naomi’s instructions because she not only trusts Naomi, but because she has chosen to become part of Israel.  She doesn’t complain or suggest other ways of finding food that make her feel less inferior as a foreigner; she simply obeys Naomi and begins her ‘ingrafting’ into the Olive Tree of Israel.

“You [of the nations] were estranged from the national life of Isra’el. You were foreigners to the covenants embodying God’s promise. You were in this world without hope and without God. But now, you who were once far off have been brought near through the shedding of the Messiah’s blood. So then, you are no longer foreigners and strangers. On the contrary, you are fellow-citizens with God’s people and members of God’s family” (Ephesians 2:12,17,19).

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Because of  her obedience to Naomi, Ruth is blessed in the field as she gleans.  She is protected by staying close to the other women. She meets the owner of the field who gives her special treatment and extra provisions.   She learns that Boaz is her mother-in-law’s kinsman-redeemer, Naomi’s nearest male blood-relative.   According to the Biblical instruction, Boaz is the only man in Bethlehem qualified to marry Naomi so that she might have a child and not lose her land inheritance.

“If brothers live together, and one of them dies childless, his widow is not to marry someone unrelated to him; her husband’s brother is to go to her and perform the duty of a brother-in-law by marrying her.  The first child she bears will succeed to the name of his dead brother, so that his name will not be eliminated from Isra’el” (Deuteronomy 25:5-6, Matthew 22:24).  

Naomi gives Ruth more instructions to Ruth who replies, “I will do whatever you say.”  Ruth does not question the Jewish woman with whom she has chosen to live nor the Israelite culture which she has chosen to make her own.   She obeys Naomi’s instructions.  She puts on special perfumes, heads off to the barley threshing floor after dusk, lies down next to Boaz, and uncovers his feet. When Boaz awakens, he sees Ruth and is blessed by her actions –– a request for marriage.  He covers Ruth with his robe acknowledging that ‘he will be her covering.’ By doing this, he accepts her proposal.

“Adonai-Tzva’ot says, ‘When that time comes, ten men will take hold — speaking all the languages of the nations — will grab hold of the cloak of a Jew and say, “We want to go with you, because we have heard that God is with you” (Zechariah 8:10).

The next day he meets with ten elders at the city gates to find out if there are any closer relatives that could be Naomi’s kinsman redeemer.  There are none who are free to redeem and marry Naomi.  Because of Naomi’s age and inability to bear children, Boaz marries Ruth. Together, they have a son they name Obed, who becomes the grandfather of King David.

Ruth is the perfect example to gentile believers in Messiah that there is blessing and reward in becoming part of the Olive Tree of Israel. Though she only gleaned for a short time from the barley field, the harvest of her life brought salvation for the Jewish people and the nations.

“So then, you [non-Jews] are no longer foreigners and strangers [to the covenants, promises, Torah]. On the contrary, you are fellow-citizens with God’s people and members of God’s family [the commonwealth of Isra’el].  You have been built on the foundation of the emissaries [apostles] and the prophets, with the cornerstone being Yeshua the Messiah himself. In union with him the whole building is held together, and it is growing into a holy temple in union with the Lord. Yes, in union with him, you yourselves are being built together into a spiritual dwelling-place for God!” (Ephesians 2:19-21).

©2011 Tentstake Ministries Publishing, all rights reserved.  No copying or reproducing of this article without crediting the author or Tentstake Ministries Publishing. 

Enoch’s and the Angelic Realm

“I saw the path of the angels. I perceived at the extremity of the earth the firmament of heaven above it. Then I passed on towards the south; where burnt, both by day and night, six mountains formed of glorious stones; three towards the east, and three towards the south. Those which were towards the east were of a variegated stone; one of which was of margarite, and another of antimony. Those towards the south were of a red stone. The middle one reached to heaven like the throne of God; a throne composed of alabaster, the top of which was of sapphire. I saw, too, a blazing fire hanging over all the mountains” (1 Enoch 18:6-10).

Kaddish

May His great name be magnified and sanctified in the universe that was created according to His will, and may His Kingdom be established, and may redemption sprout forth, and may His anointed one come. May it happen in your lifetime, and in your days, and in the lifetime of all the House of Israel. Speedily and very soon and they should say “Amen.” May His great name be blessed forever and ever and ever, may the name of the Holy One, blessed be He, be blessed and lauded and beautified and exalted and raised up and glorified and elevated and praised higher than any blessing and song, praise and consolation that we could say in the world. And they should say Amen.

A Tale of Two Trees

“Out of the ground Adonai, God, caused to grow every tree pleasing in appearance and good for food, including the tree of life in the middle of the garden and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil” (Genesis 2:9).

The Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil

The tale of this tree begins when Elohim presented two trees to Adam in the Garden of Eden. He explained the consequence of eating from the Tree of The Knowledge of Good and Evil: death.

I have a vision of this Tree as having one large split trunk called Knowledge. The part of the trunk splitting to the right is ‘Good’ and the other is ‘Evil.’ From each trunk smaller branches reach out with numerous leaves hanging from the branches. Each leaf defines what is ‘good’ and what is ‘evil.’ Whether a leaf produces ‘good’ or ‘evil’ fruit, it is still the fruit of the same tree, a tree that brings death.

Death has two parts: physical and spiritual. Physical death happens when the mortal body returns to the dust from which it came (Ecclesiastes 12:7). Spiritual death is described as eternal separation from Elohim. Even though a person may have a physical life, if they remain spiritually dead, they will be thrown into the lake of fire burning with sulfur to suffer for all eternity (Revelation 14:10-11, 20:15).

After Adam and Havah (Eve) disobeyed Elohim and ate the fruit of the forbidden tree, they were removed from the Garden of Eden. They were sent into the world where they experienced the full knowledge of ‘good’ and ‘evil.’ Havah had children which was ‘good,’ but she watched her son become ‘evil’ and kill his brother. Though there was some ‘good’ with the birth of Seth and when people called on the name of Adonai, ‘evil’ escalated from Nimrod to Noach (Genesis 6:5).

Many years ago my mother-in-law and I discussed death and eternity. She felt she had no need for ‘God’ because she considered herself a ‘good’ person. In fact, she was anti-semitic and wouldn’t have considered a Jewish Savior. I discussed this same subject with a young man who believed only ‘bad’ people went to ‘hell’ and didn’t consider himself ‘bad.’ My question to both: “Who determines the baseline for ‘good’ and ‘evil’? You? Me? Who?

“Because on the day that you eat from it, it will become certain that you will die” (Genesis 2:17 NASB).

When people die, especially innocent ones, those who grieve create a dishonest theology. For example, a young man driving home from work falls asleep at the wheel of his car, hits a tree, and dies leaving a wife and three small children. At his funeral his loved ones say, “He is watching over us.” Why do they say this? Because they need to believe that ‘good’ people are rewarded with some sort of life after death. It makes them feel ‘good’ to believe ‘someone’ they love or loved them is watching over them; that isn’t ‘evil.’

Or, a young alcoholic woman goes to a bar, gets drunk, drives her car off the road and not only kills herself, but several others walking along the road. Inevitably, at the funeral of the ‘innocents,’ the loved ones will say, “They were such good people and we will see them again” with the idea that because of their tragic death, they will be rewarded life after death. The poor girl who caused the accident may be deemed ‘evil’ by those same people while her family rationalizes their pain by suggesting she is now ‘resting in peace.’

Apart from bringing sin into the world through Adam, the serpent brought forth a great deception when he said to Havah, “It is not true that you will surely die” (Genesis 3:4). This lie is the tap root that established the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil in the soul of mankind. The lie that there is no eternal death keeps the masses believing that everyone who automatically dies passes into some ‘happy ever after’ realm. After all, how many people would honestly say, “Poor Joe is now lost for all time?”

Adam and Havah lost their spiritual life in the Garden and each of us has been born into that same loss. We chew on the same ‘good’ and ‘evil’ leaves of the Tree. There is no one born into this world who will not surely die –– physically as well a spiritually –– whether they pick leaves from the ‘good’ trunk or ‘evil’ trunk. They are both trunks of the same Tree of Death.

The Tree of Life

“Adonai, God, said, “See, the man has become like one of us, knowing good and evil. Now, to prevent his putting out his hand and taking also from the tree of life, eating, and living forever” (Genesis 3:22).

The tale of the second tree also begins in the Garden of Eden. Though Elohim explained the consequence of the one tree, He didn’t explain death. He also did not explain the blessing of eternal life with Him.

Adam and Havah learned quickly that death separated them from their Creator. They were removed from Paradise because Elohim did not want them to eat from the Tree of Life while in a state of spiritual death. He did, however, explain that One from the ‘Seed of woman’ would come and restore Paradise (Genesis 3:15).

Restoration to eternal life with our Creator comes through the ‘Seed of woman’ who defeated the curse of death by rising from the dead. He is the only One who is able to watch over us and see what we we’re doing. He is the One who raised people from the dead because he is the ‘resurrection and the life’ (John 11:25). He is the One who restores eternal life to anyone who puts their faith in him (John 3:35-36). He is the Way that restores spiritual life to all mankind because it is Elohim’s will that each person return to the Garden of Eden. This One’s name is Yeshua and means ‘salvation.’

When Lazarus died, Martha believed in a resurrection of the dead at the Last Day and put her faith in the promises of the prophets. She knew that Yeshua represented the presence of Adonai on earth and proclaimed her faith in Him. She was rewarded with seeing her brother restored to life and tasted a healing leaf from the Tree of Life.

“Yeshua said to her, “I AM the Resurrection and the Life! Whoever puts his trust in me will live, even if he dies; and everyone living and trusting in me will never die. Do you believe this?” (John 11:25-26).

Do you believe what Yeshua asked Martha? Do you believe that Yeshua is the Way to the Tree of Life? Everyone who rejects the Way provided by Elohim does not experience eternal life after physically dying. If family and friends have not accepted the Way provided by Yeshua, then they don’t have any life after death either. Without Yeshua, there is no eternal life; there is no eating the leaves of the Tree of Life.

The Two Choices

When Yeshua hung on the cross, two criminals hung with him. Each of them had the same choice that each of us has up to the moment of death: to trust Yeshua for eternal life or reject him. One criminal mocked Yeshua as many do today; he continued to eat from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. The other criminal, even though he knew he was guilty of a crime, acknowledged that Yeshua was the King of a coming Kingdom. Proclaiming his faith in the promise of eternal life even with his last breath brought a promise from Yeshua –– that in the Last Day he would be with him in Paradise eating leaves from the Tree of Life (Luke 23:39-43).

“I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living” (Psalm 27:13).

My mother-in-law who was 92 years old passed away several years ago. She went to sleep never to wake up in Paradise. She was definitely a ‘good’ woman and loved by her family, but she did not understand the offer of Yeshua and didn’t choose it. Her eternal destiny is the lake of burning fire and sulfur unless in the last breaths of her life, she admitted her sinful condition and cried out like the criminal on the cross. I won’t know until the the Resurrection, but I cannot say with confidence that I will see her in the ‘land of the living.’

My mother passed away when she was 43 years old. She was a ‘good’ woman, too. Tragically she died young from leukemia. Though the process of her death was very difficult to watch, I knew when she passed that I would see her again at the Resurrection on the Last Day, not because she was young, loved, or suffered for months, but because she had put her faith in Jesus and his promise of eternal life. She lived and died walking out that faith bearing fruit –– the very large church was packed with those who loved her at her funeral. I know that I will see her in the ‘land of the living.’

Today, we still have a choice between eternal life and eternal death. We can choose to continue eating the fruit from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and remain in a spiritually dead condition thinking everyone is ‘good’ and there is no one truly ‘evil’ and worthy of eternal death in the lake of burning fire and sulfur. Or, we can choose eternal life through faith in Yeshua and enter the restored Garden of Eden and eat the healing leaves from the Tree of Life.

©2020 Tentstake Ministries Publishing, all rights reserved.  No copying or reproducing of this article without crediting the author or Tentstake Ministries Publishing.

Dr. Peter McCullough

Dr. Peter McCullough is another world-reknown virologist/epidemiologist who has testified in Senate and Congressional hearings about vaccine injuries. This two-part interview on American Thought Leaders with Jan Jakeilek is very informative. This interview uses pod casts.

Part 1 of the interview

Part 2 of the interview

Dr. McCullough says that healthy children should not be given the ‘vaccine.’