Posts Tagged ‘Sabbath’

Nishmat Prayer (“The soul of …”)

The soul of every living being shall bless Your Name, Elohim our God, the spirit of all flesh shall always glorify and exalt Your remembrance, our King. From this world to the World to Come, You are God, and other than You we have no king, redeemer, or savior. He who liberates, rescues and sustains, answers and is merciful in every time of distress and anguish, we have no king, helper or supporter but You!

God of the first and the last, God of all creatures, Master of all Generations, Who is extolled through a multitude of praises, Who guides His world with kindness and His creatures with mercy. Elohim is truth; He neither slumbers nor sleeps. He Who rouses the sleepers and awakens the slumberers. Who raises the dead and heals the sick, causes the blind to see and straightens the bent. Who makes the mute speak and reveals what is hidden. To You alone we give thanks!

Were our mouth as full of song as the sea, and our tongue as full of joyous song as its multitude of waves, and our lips as full of praise as the breadth of the heavens, and our eyes as brilliant as the sun and the moon, and our hands as outspread as the eagles of the sky and our feet as swift as hinds — we still could not thank You sufficiently, Elohim our God and God of our forefathers, and to bless Your Name for even one of the thousand thousand, thousands of thousands and myriad myriads of favors, miracles and wonders that you performed for our ancestors and for us. At first You redeemed us from Egypt, Elohim our God, and liberated us from the house of bondage. In famine You nourished us, and in plenty you sustained us. From sword you saved us; from plague you let us escape; and from severe and enduring diseases you spared us. Until now Your mercy has helped us, and Your kindness has not forsaken us. Do not abandon us, Elohim our God, forever. Therefore the organs that you set within us and the spirit and soul that you breathed into our nostrils, and the tongue that you placed in our mouth – all of them shall thank and bless and praise and glorify, exalt and revere, be devoted, sanctify and declare the sovereignty of Your Name, our King. For every mouth shall offer thanks to You; every tongue shall vow allegiance to You; every knee shall bend to You; every erect spine shall prostrate itself before You; all hearts shall fear You; and all innermost feelings and thoughts shall sing praises to Your name, as it is written: “All my bones shall say, Elohim who is like You? You save the poor man from one who is stronger than he, the poor and destitute from the one who would rob him.”

The outcry of the poor You hear, the screams of the destitute You listen to, and You save. And it is written: “Sing joyfully, O righteous, before Elohim; for the upright praise is fitting.”

By the mouth of the upright You shall be exalted;
By the lips of the righteous shall You be blessed;
By the tongue of the devout shall You be sanctified;
And amid the holy shall You be lauded.

And in the assemblies of the myriads of Your people, the House of Israel, it is the duty of all creatures, before you Elohim, our God and God of our forefathers to thank, laud, praise, glorify, exalt, adore, render triumphant, bless, raise high, and sing praises – even beyond all expressions of the songs and praises of David, the son of Jesse, Your servant, Your anointed.

And thus may Your name be praised forever- our King, the God, the Great and holy King – in heaven and on earth. Because for you it is fitting – Elohim our God and God of our forefathers – song and praise, lauding and hymns, power and dominion, triumph, greatness and strength, praise and splendor, holiness and sovereignty, blessings and thanksgivings to Your Great and Holy Name; from this world to the World to Come You are God. Blessed are You elohim, God, King exalted through praises, God of thanksgivings, Master of Wonders, Creator of all souls, Master of all deeds, Who chooses the musical songs of praise – King, Unique One, God, Life-Giver of the world.

Blessing for Sabbath Day

Praise to You, Adonai our God, Sovereign of the universe who finding favor with us, sanctified us with mitzvot. In love and favor, You made the holy Shabat our heritage as a reminder of the work of Creation. As first among our sacred days, it recalls the Exodus from Egypt. You chose us and set us apart from the peoples. In love and favor You have given us Your holy Shabbat as an inheritance.

Baruch atah, Adonai Eloheinu, Melech haolam, asher kid’shanu b’mitzvotav v’ratzah vanu, v’Shabbat kodsho b’ahavah uv’ratzon hinchilanu, zikaron l’maaseih v’reishit.

Ki hu yom t’chilah l’mikra-ei kodesh, zecher litziat Mitzrayim. Ki vanu vacharta, v’otanu kidashta, mikol haamim. V’Shabbat kodsh’cha b’ahavah uv’ratzon hinchaltanu. Baruch atah, Adonai, m’kadeish HaShabbat.

Journey With Jeremiah: Nourishment for the Wild Olive

Journey Cover

To Purchase

“Treat the Messiah as holy, as Lord in your hearts; while remaining always ready to give a reasoned answer to anyone who asks you to explain the hope you have in you —” (1 Peter 3:15).

Journey with Jeremiah is a compilation of reasoned responses written to answer questions regarding a ‘gentile’ walk of faith in the Jewish Messiah of Israel. It will challenge a gentile’s spiritual attitudes and how they live out their love for the God of Israel and His Son, Jesus (Yeshua). It will move the non-Jew from a crossroads in their faith onto the ancient paths bringing nourishment to the wild olive.

Part One explores many of the misunderstood doctrines in historical Christianity: the new covenant, the problem in Galatia, the law vs. the Law, Peter’s vision, and the timing of Jesus’ birth. Part Two brings the ancient shadows into the reality of Yeshua giving prophetic insights into the unexplained ‘Jewish festivals’ that leave holes in the pages of the New Testament. Part Three gives simple recipes, study guides and crafts to use when celebrating the Biblical holidays.

Note: Purchases are made through CreateSpace and Amazon.com with a credit card.  If you need to purchase through Paypal, please contact me directly: julie@tentstakeministries.

Kindle Edition

Comments from those who have read the book:

“This book is so good I can’t put it down.  Everyone should have a copy!” D. Carlson

“My Bible study group could learn so much from this book.” A. David

“I am going to buy a copy of this book for everyone in my family.”  K. Pilger

“I am so excited that all of your writings are now in one book that I can read and reread.” P. Nelson

“Thanks so much for writing this book.  I look forward to joining you on your Jeremiah Journey!”  D. Griffith

Venerable Day of the Sun

Sunday church was part of my life growing up.  I attended weekly  services as a child and sang in the choir and played handbells as a teenager.   I never questioned Sunday worship because it was just what everyone I knew did.  My family went to church on Sunday.  Period.  As an adult, I continued to attend Sunday church services until the LORD showed me His better way of the Sabbath.   

Many years ago, our family had some visitors from New Zealand.  After spending several days with us and learning about our Messianic walk of faith, they asked if they could stay for Sabbath extending their stay a couple of days.  While reading some Scriptures, the husband interrupted and asked why the church doesn’t keep the Sabbath.  Before anyone in our family could answer his question, his wife responded, “The catholic church changed it.”  Not only did they change it, they said we are now obliged to Sunday instead of the ‘ancient Sabbath.’

“Instead of the seventh day, and other festivals appointed by the old law, the church has prescribed the Sundays and holy days to be set apart for God’s worship; and these we are now obliged to keep in consequence of God’s commandment, instead of the ancient Sabbath” (The Catholic Christian Instructed in the Sacraments, Sacrifices, Ceremonies, and Observances of the Church By Way of Question and Answer, RT Rev. Dr. Challoner, p. 204.)

Like Christmas and Easter, Sunday worship has its roots in the history of the catholic church and church fathers who developed the idea that Sunday was the memorial day for Jesus’ resurrection.’  Sunday is named for the ‘sun’ and probably came from ancient Egyptian astrology.

In 321 C.E., Constantine decreed that Sunday would be observed as the Roman day of rest:  “On the venerable Day of the Sun let the magistrates and people residing in cities rest, and let all workshops be closed. In the country, however, persons engaged in agriculture may freely and lawfully continue their pursuits; because it often happens that another day is not so suitable for grain-sowing or vine-planting; lest by neglecting the proper moment for such operations the bounty of heaven should be lost” (Philip Schaff, History of the Christian Church: Vol. II: From Constantine the Great to Gregory the Great A.D. 311–600 (New York: Charles Scribner, 1867) page 380 note 1.)

This doctrine was codified at the Council of Nicea in 325 C.E. with its many other anti-semitic regulations further separating the Jewish Sabbath from the Christian Sunday.  In 363 C.E. the Council of Laodicea prohibited Christians from observing the Biblical Sabbath and encouraged them to work on Saturday and rest on the Sunday.   The fact that this edict was issued with prohibitions indicates that Sunday worship was still not totally accepted by followers of Christ. 

Yeshua sent an angel to the church in Laodicea warning them about mixing the holy and the profane, the hot and the cold.  It makes him vomit!   He tells this lukewarm congregation that he stands at the door and knocks and if anyone hears his voice and opens the door, he will eat with them (Revelation 3:14-20).  This is a reference to the Sabbath day, the fourth (dalet or door) commandment along with the words, the ruler of God’s creation.  It would seem that Yeshua already knew that Laodicea would fall away from the truth and mix it with lies.   Only those with ‘ears to hear’ would be victorious and sit on thrones to rule and reign with Him. 

Contrary to God’s command for the Sabbath day,  Sunday worship was mandated by the Roman Catholic Church as the sabbath of Christian worship.   According to all calendars, historic and modern-day, Sunday is the first, not the Biblically commanded seventh day of the week.  The outline of God’s creational week of working for six days and resting on the seventh was transformed into a Sunday ‘sabbath’ having people rest on the first day of the week and then working.   I remember when an elder in a church I attended brought that little fact to my attention.  Though we worshipped on Sunday, he commented, “I wonder how God will deal with the church for turning His order around – resting then working rather than working and resting.”   

Of course, we can worship God any day of the week we desire.  In fact, we should worship Him every day as Creator of the Universe and for all the blessings and promises He brings into our lives.  However, that doesn’t mean His Sabbath should have become a day disdained by Christianity through anti-semitic edicts and blatantly misinterpreted Scriptures undeniably proving that believing Jews and gentiles came together on Sabbath in synagogues to hear the reading of the Torah and the Prophets.   Acts 20:7 is one example:

“On the first day of the week we came together to break bread. Paul spoke to the people and, because he intended to leave the next day, kept on talking until midnight.”

Without even discussing that Biblical days are rendered evening to evening, is it really possible that Paul would begin to speak during a Sunday morning worship service and continue until midnightand then leave the next day?  Would people really sit for 15-20 hours to  listen to him proclaim the Word of God when today an hour is too long? 

Verse 8 gives an important detail to understanding this event, “There were many lamps in the upstairs room where we were meeting.”  Biblical days are rendered sunset to sunset.  This means that when Paul started speaking on the first day of the week, it was after sunset or Saturday evening.   He talked for four or five hours which is more realistic. Eutychus goes to sleep because it’s late, falls out the window and dies. After Eutychus is resurrected from the dead, Paul leaves in the morning which would be Sunday morning.

“On the first day of every week, each one of you should set aside a sum of money in keeping with your income, saving it up, so that when I come no collections will have to be made” (1 Corinthians 16:2).

This verse is often used to support collecting tithes and offerings at Sunday morning church services.  Does this verse really suggest passing the offering plates at a Sunday service?  No, it says that on the ‘first day of the week,’ when business began again after the Sabbath, offerings should be set aside so that when Paul returned, there would be no need for a collection on the Sabbath.   

“And let us … not give up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing, but encouraging one another—and all the more as you see the Day approaching” (Hebrews 10:25).

There is nothing in this verse in Hebrews to suggest that meeting together was to happen on the first day of the week or forsaking the fellowship meant not going to church on Sunday.   Though it’s very important to meet together, to encourage one another, the ‘first day of the week’ is not specifically mentioned; while the Sabbath and other Biblical holy days were already established meeting times. 

Sunday is often called ‘The LORD’s Day’ as if the Yeshua actually honored it as such.  In Matthew 12:8 and Mark 2:28, Yeshua said “So the Son of Man is Lord even of the Sabbath.”  At the time he made these statements, the Sabbath was still the seventh day,  therefore the ‘Day of the LORD,’ if used in this manner, should still be the seventh-day  Sabbath.  Since the word Sabbath has its Hebrew root in sheva or ‘seven,’  it would always be the seventh day, not the first, third or any day that man desires.

“On the Lord’s Day I was in the Spirit, and I heard behind me a loud voice like a trumpet,  which said: “Write on a scroll what you see and send it to the seven churches …” (Revelation 1:10).

Many interpret this Scripture to mean that on a Sunday morning,  the apostle John was in the Spirit and given revelation.   However, the passage doesn’t say it was on a Sunday.  This inference comes from centuries of Christian theology that moved the Sabbath to the first day of the week and then called it The LORD’s Day.

John was a Jew and well-versed in the Hebrew language of the Hebrew Scriptures.  To him the phrase en teé juriake´heem´ra (The LORD’s Day) would imply what is called by the prophets Isaiah, Joel and Amos as “The Day of the LORD” or the time of the coming judgment that brings forth the Messianic age. 

There are other clues in the passage to the timing of The LORD’s Day and neither have anything to do with Sunday.   John heard a loud voice that sounded like a trumpet.  Since the book of Revelation is about prophecy, to use the sound of the trumpet as a prophetic voice is appropriate.  Also, the Feast of Trumpets is believed to be the time for preparing for God’s judgment of earth and its people, therefore, it could be argued that the Day of the LORD begins on Feast of Trumpets.   The trumpet voice tells John to send seven messages to the seven churches in East Asia.  These messages contain warnings for ‘The Day of the LORD’ so those in the congregations who have ‘ears to hear’ will recognize the times and be prepared. 

Still, some Christians perpetuate Sunday as The LORD’s Day, but this is really nothing more than ignorance. When they wish someone a ‘Happy Lord’s Day,’ they are really wishing them a ‘Happy Judgment Day’ which is quite different from saying ‘Shabbat Shalom’ or ‘Sabbath Peace.’   The real blessing of the ‘The LORD’s Day’  is not about wishing someone a  great worship time on Sunday, but in reading book of Revelation and the prophecy it contains (Revelation 1:1-3).

The  change from the Sabbath command to a ‘first day of the week’ memorial to the sun god was not instituted by Yeshua or the Apostles, but by the Roman church that didn’t heed Paul’s warnings about arrogance over the natural branches of the Olive Tree. This brings great misunderstanding to the prophetic revelation given to John regarding the events of the ‘Day of the LORD’ and the return of the Messiah to Jerusalem. 

“He then brought me into the inner court of the house of the Lord, and there at the entrance to the temple, between the portico and the altar, were about twenty-five men. With their backs toward the temple of the Lord and their faces toward the east, they were bowing down to the sun in the east” (Ezekiel 8:16).

The prophet Ezekiel had a vision of the Temple in Jerusalem before the glory of the LORD departs through the Eastern Gate and stops over the Mount of Olives.  Digging through a hole at the entrance to the court, Ezekiel witnesses seventy elders of Israel offering incense to foreign gods.  Twenty-five men are in the inner courts near the altar.  They face east with their backs toward the Temple and bow to the sun.   These detestable things, the worship of the sun in the east,  force God to remove His glory from the Temple.  His glory will not return until Yeshua sets his feet on the Mount of Olives and all the detestable practices of the nations are removed from his Kingdom people. 

Having learned about some of the pagan roots of Halloween, Christmas, Easter and Sunday, perhaps Paul’s words to Galatia can be read and understood in the context in which he wrote them to gentile followers of Messiah:

“Formerly, when you did not know God, you were slaves to those who by nature are not gods. But now that you know God—or rather are known by God—how is it that you are turning back to those weak and miserable forces? Do you wish to be enslaved by them all over again?  You are observing special days and months and seasons and years!  I fear for you, that somehow I have wasted my efforts on you” (Galatians 4:8-11).

©2015 Tentstake Ministries, chapter from Journey with Jeremiah on amazon.com