Posts Tagged ‘repentance’

Repentance – Hebrew: Teshuvah

תשוב

In Hebrew the word for ‘repent’ is shuv and means ‘to repent and turn away, ‘to turn back’ or ‘return.’ This word is found over 400 times in the Hebrew Scriptures. Teshuvah, is the Hebrew word for ‘repentance’ and means ‘a return to righteousness.’

“Men are to return from ‘sin,’ which is a path, a life-style, or act deviating from that which God has marked out. They should depart from sin, be concerned about it, confess it …” (Vines Expository Dictionary of Hebrew and Greek Words).

““Make the heart of this people [sluggish with] fat, stop up their ears, and shut their eyes. Otherwise, seeing with their eyes, and hearing with their ears, then understanding with their hearts, they might repent and be healed!” (Isaiah 6:10).

“For this is what Adonai Elohim, the Holy One of Isra’el, says: “Returning [teshuvah] and resting is what will save you; calmness and confidence will make you strong — but you want none of this!” (Isaiah 30:15).

“With a winnowing fork I am scattering them to the wind at the gates of the land; I am bereaving them, destroying my people, because they will not return [teshuvah] from their ways” (Jeremiah 15:7).

Yeshua and Sha’ul use the same Hebrew concept of ‘returning’ or ‘turning from sin’ when they speak about repentance. Sha’ul taught this concept not only in Jerusalem and Judea, but also to the gentile nations.

Turn from your sins to God, for the Kingdom of Heaven is near!” (Matthew 3:2).

“But I prayed for you, Shim‘on, that your trust might not fail. And you, once you have turned back in repentance, strengthen your brothers!” (Luke 22:32)

“In the same way, I tell you, there is joy among God’s angels when one sinner repents [returns]” (Luke 15:10).

“On the contrary, I announced first in Dammesek, then in Yerushalayim and throughout Y’hudah, and also to the Goyim, that they should turn from their sins to God and then do deeds consistent with that repentance (Acts 26:20).

Hebrew Word Pictures

ת Tav – Crossed Sticks means ‘sign’ or ‘covenant.’

ש Shin – A Tooth means ‘consume’ or ‘destroy.’

ו Vav – A Nail means ‘binding.’

ב Bet – A House means ‘house’ or ‘family.’

ה Hey – A Window means ‘reveal’ or ‘behold.’

The Hebrew Word Picture for teshuvah: sign destroying the binding house revealed.

©2020 Tentstake Ministries Publishing, all rights reserved.  No copying or reproducing of this article without crediting the author or Tentstake Ministries Publishing.

Stop Americanizing Jesus

Okay. Usually I just pass by this crap and let those (LGBT Christians) who believe this stuff, believe it. But today I feel like dealing with the nonsense that gets passed around social media as if it were great wisdom and enlightenment. It’s not. It’s stupid and it’s wrong on every level. Here goes:


Jesus was NOT Palestinian. The name Palestine was given to the land of Israel by the Romans. Jesus was not Roman. He was not a Philistine from Philistia either. He was Jewish, with Jewish parents, from the Tribe of Judah, an Israelite, a Hebrew. His skin color was olive, not black African or white British or red Chinese. He was Mediterranean, Middle Eastern.


He was not anti-colonialism. He wanted people to enter his Kingdom which is not of this world. It’s not for everyone, only a remnant of people, and could therefore be considered ‘a colony.’ He never taught anyone to fight against the Romans who had colonized Israel, even changing the name of the land. He taught his Jewish brothers and sisters to walk the extra mile carrying a soldier’s armor if they asked. Ultimately, those who become part of his Kingdom are all foreigners in this world. Our citizenship is somewhere else – a heavenly colony that will one day become the ‘new heavens and new earth’ called the New Jerusalem.


He was not anti-cultural unless it is the culture of this dying world and its sin-infested ideas and demands. He fully lived his life within the context of his culture which was outlined by the God of Israel in Torah. He didn’t eat pork which is in everything these days, even eaten by some Jews. He didn’t celebrate Christmas or Easter or worship the sun god on Sunday. He wasn’t gay, transgendered or confused about binary and pan. He was a Son and was quite content being a male son. He kept the Feasts of His Father, was circumcised, not mutilated, on the eighth day of his life, redeemed as a firstborn, learned the commandments, and lived as a Jewish man within the Jewish culture.


He did not teach socialism, but said there would always be poor people. He did not condemn rich people; he was buried in a rich man’s tomb. Though he told a parable about giving each man the same wage for different hours worked, this was a parable about the Kingdom and not about a socio-economic system in this world. The entrance fee into his Kingdom is not based on how hard a man works. He looked at the heart; the men looked at the wage he paid. If he were supporting socio-economics, he would have been more of a capitalist because each person will receive a reward for the works they have done for the Kingdom. If the person works building with gold and precious stones, their works will stand, but if the person builds with hay, they will burn.


Yes, he loved all people including tax collectors and prostitutes, but told them to ‘repent’ and turn back to God. His love made them want his ways, not their own. He cast demons out of people and set them free from all manner of psychosis, prostitution, and disease. His message never included tolerance of sin. He never condoned people living immorally because it infects the rest of society. He healed lepers so they could return to normal life. He offered hope and a way out of sinful lifestyles. He offered and gave freedom from the distress caused by the sexual sins of the flesh.


Absolutely he respected women because his Father’s teachings and instructions are all about protecting and providing for women and children. He was not for women’s rights and bashing men – white, black or red. He saw men and women as co-heirs to the Kingdom. He would never have supported the woman’s right to murder her unborn or he may have been murdered himself in the womb. He was not for women to usurp the roles of men. He loved and respected women for their roles as wives and mothers who loved to serve not be served.


Anti-immigrant. I am reminded that he says that not everyone who says “Lord, Lord” will enter the Kingdom, only those who do His Father’s will. There is a difference between being an immigrant and joining a country through its laws versus being an illegal alien who is kept out. He tells a parable about a man who attends a wedding feast wearing the wrong clothes and is thrown out of the wedding. For the man wearing the wrong clothes that seemed harsh, but for those who dressed correctly, it was justice.

There are gates for entering the New Jerusalem and outside those gates are those who may not enter:

“But as for the cowardly, the untrustworthy, the vile, the murderers, the sexually immoral, those involved with the occult and with drugs, idol-worshippers, and all liars — their destiny is the lake burning with fire and sulfur, the second death.”

There are those who will suffer and die because they believe all sorts of lies. Christian witches will suffer and die a second death. Idol worshippers and liars will suffer and die a second death. The sexually immoral (LGBTXYZ) will suffer and die a second death. This is what the Bible teaches, if you don’t like it, then don’t pretend to know what it or Jesus says.


Of course Jesus wasn’t anti-semitic because he is from the semitic people who descended from Shem. Palestinians are anti-semitic and want all Jews and Israelis dead. Again, he wasn’t Palestinian, Roman, or any other nationality. He was Jewish.


As for gay-bashing, he is the Word of God in the flesh and God’s Word specifically says that homosexual behavior is an abomination. Did he bash? The Scripture never mentions him meeting a gay person, but Sodom and Gomorrah were judged for their illicit sexual behavior. Had he met a gay couple, he would have told them to ‘repent’ and turn back to God. He would not have baked a cake for their wedding feast!


Fan of Donald Trump? Because he is incarnate God and God puts men in leadership for his purposes, I would say that he has a purpose for Donald Trump. Fan? That comes from the word ‘fanatic’ and the only thing he was ‘fanatic’ about was the Kingdom and those who enter into it. He was ‘fanatic’ about those who are lost and dying because he desired them to know the Truth and be set free so they could live eternally. He wasn’t a supporter of sin, but a redeemer from sin.

While we’re at it, lets just add that the name above all names wasn’t Jesus either – it was Yeshua. So, yes, STOP Americanizing the King of Kings, the Jewish Messiah of Israel. Read. The. Bible. Know God. Know Yeshua.

©2019 Tentstake Ministries Publishing, all rights reserved.  No copying or reproducing of this article without crediting the author or Tentstake Ministries Publishing.

In the Days of Nehemiah

“It was the first day of the seventh month” (Nehemiah 8:2).

This specific verse in Nehemiah sets the time for the events to follow as the ‘first day of the seventh month’ or Yom Teruah, the Feast of Trumpets.  This ‘appointed time’ of God begins His season of the fall feasts which are about repentance, atonement and a vision of the coming Millennial Kingdom.

The events in Nehemiah 8 are not some random occurrences in the history of Israel.  They are a testimony to the restoration of the Feasts of Adonai to a people who had lived in exile for over 160 years.  Though there was a first wave of Jewish return to Jerusalem 70 years after being taken captive, Ezra and Nehemiah were in the second wave 90 years later.  It was during this time that the priests gathered the people together on the ‘first day of the seventh month’.

Yom Teruah 445 B.C.E.

A wooden platform was made on which Ezra, the priest,  stood and could be seen and heard by all of the men and women who came to listen to the reading of the Torah.  As he opened the Torah scroll, everyone stood.  Then Ezra blessed Adonai, the great God.  As the people answered with “Amen”,  they lifted up their hands, bowed their heads, and fell prostrate before Adonai with their faces to the ground. 

“Amen” has a very interesting root history.  It comes from the Hebrew word aman meaning ‘to nourish, support, make sure and strong’.   The word emunah or faithfulness also has its root in aman.   The Jewish sages say that amen is an acronym for el melek ne’eman or “God is a faithful King’.  According to Revelation 3:14, Yeshua is the “the amen, the faithful and true witness … he is the faithful King.”   What the people said  as they were about to hear the Torah was “God is a faithful King!”

Days of Awe and Repentance

The Levites had the responsibility to explain Torah to the people.  After being in a foreign country for several generations, they needed to translate the Hebrew so that the ‘Persian’ Jews would  understand the words being read.  When they heard the  instructions that Adonai gave them through Moshe, the people began to weep. 

Repentance or making teshuvah, ‘turning back to God,’ is central to the fall ‘appointed times.’   After hearing the words of Torah for the first time standing in Jerusalem, the people wept.  They grieved.  They understood they had lost the very essence of their national heritage and had not lived accordingly.

Ezra, along with the rest of the Levites, told them not to weep, not to be sad for this day was ‘set apart to Adonai their God.’  It was His ‘appointed time.’ They were told to go out, eat rich food, drink sweet drinks, and give portions to those who couldn’t provide for themselves.  Even today sweet foods are eaten on Feast of Trumpets with apples and honey being the traditional foods.

How sweet to my tongue is your promise, truly sweeter than honey in my mouth!” (Psalm 119:103).

Mouth of God

Yeshua said “Man does not live on bread alone, but on every Word that comes from the mouth of God” (Matthew 4:4).  What does the mouth or ‘voice of God’ sound like?

Ram's Horn Shofar

When John was exiled on the island of Patmos, he has a revelation of Messiah.  He says,  “I came to be, in the Spirit, on the Day of Adonai; and I heard behind me a loud voice, like a shofar ….”   The voice of Adonai sounded like the blowing of a shofar.  A shofar or ram’s horn is blown on the Feast of Trumpets.  Obviously, it is only when breath goes through the shofar that it is able to create a sound.  Being vessels of Adonai’s Spirit, it is taught that the ‘breath of God’ blows through a shofar when it sounds.  

John heard the voice that sounded like a shofar on the Day of the LORD.  This is in reference to the events surrounding the coming Messianic Era and a time of judgment, not the first day of the week.  The events for the Day of Adonai will begin on ‘the first day of the seventh month’ or Yom Teruah.

Pool of Siloam

The Spring of Living Water


The original city of Jerusalem had very different boundaries than modern-day Jerusalem.  In fact, remnants of the city are found in what is known as the City of David.  Within the ‘older’ city of Jerusalem, the Water Gate led down to the Gihon Spring which was located in the Kidron Valley.  This spring was the main source of water for the Pool of Siloam.   The priests would go to the Pool of Siloam to collect the water for each day’s water libation ceremony during the Feast of Tabernacles.  During this event, they would pour water over the Altar.  On the last and greatest day of this Feast, Yeshua stood and cried out:

“If anyone is thirsty, let him keep coming to me and drinking! Whoever puts his trust in me, as the Scripture says, rivers of living water will flow from his inmost being!” (John 7:37-39).

As the people gathered at the Water Gate, it is symbolic of the pathway to the living water of the Word of God.  With the reading of the Torah by Ezra, the Jewish people had been ‘washed in the water of the Word’ and began preparing themselves to be a pure and holy bride (Ephesians 5:25-26).   

Building Sukkot

On the second day,  the heads of the clans of the people joined the Levites and Ezra to study the words of the Torah again.  They found that Adonai had ordered that the people of Israel were to live in booths or sukkot during the ‘appointed time’ in the seventh month. They were to announce the festival of Sukkot in all of their cities and in Jerusalem.  

“Go out to the mountains, and collect branches of olives, wild olives, myrtles, palms, and other leafy trees to make sukkot, as prescribed” (Nehemiah 8:15).

Olive Tree

In Jeremiah 11:16, God calls Israel an olive tree. In Romans 11,  Sha’ul speaks about branches of olives and wild olives that make up the Olive Tree of Israel.    The natural branches represent the 12 Tribes of Israel  and the wild branches the nations that join with them.  Both receive the same living water of the Word through the same spiritual root.   Though both branches will continue to produce either natural olives or wild olives, they both produce olives.

Myrtle trees are considered an evergreen and are very hardy.   They produce a purplish-black berry called the mursins.  This fruit can be dried then ground and used as a flavoring.  It is one of the four leafy trees bound together for Sukkot that over time have been given the symbolism of ‘good smell, but no taste,’ like a person who has ‘good deeds, but does not study the Torah.’

Middle Eastern Myrtle

The prophet Zechariah lived during the time between the first and second returning remnants.  He has a vision of God, angels, and horsemen standing in the midst of a myrtle tree.  This vision was given to reinforce God’s promise that the exiles who returned to Jerusalem would be prosperous.  For the Jewish people of Zechariah’s time to prosper, they would need to repent and serve the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, rebuild the Temple, and learn Torah.  In the days of Nehemiah and Yom Teruah, the repentance had begun. 

“Therefore this is what the Lord says: ‘I will return to Jerusalem with mercy, and there my house will be rebuilt. And the measuring line will be stretched out over Jerusalem,’ declares the LORD  Almighty” (Zechariah 1:16).

Palm Tree

Palms, or lulav in Hebrew,  were also part of the branches collected to make a sukkah.  It is known for its uprightness, fruit and its beauty.  The Jewish sages say that the palm tree, which has taste but no smell, can be compared to a person who studies Torah, but has no fruit of good works. 

The first mention of palm trees in Scripture is when the Israelites camp at the oasis of Elim during their trek in the wilderness.  It is during the Feast  of Tabernacles that palm branches are waved signifying the coming Messianic Era. This is why palm branches were waved when Yeshua entered Jerusalem during the Passover season.  The people believed that the kingdom of God had arrived; however, it was the wrong ‘appointed time’ and season.    In Revelation 7:9, multitudes from every tribe and nation will be waving palm branches and giving glory to the King of Kings.  Today, the lulav is a special binding of three species of branches along with an etrog (a type of citrus fruit).  It is used to worship Adonai during Sukkot and reminds everyone that one day the nations of the world will gather in Jerusalem to celebrate the Feast of Tabernacles (Zechariah 14:16). 

images-1

The people went out from the city, collected branches from specific trees and made sukkot for themselves on the roofs of their homes, in their courtyards, in the Temple courts, and in the open spaces by the Water Gate and the Efrayim Gate. The entire community of those who had returned from the exile made sukkot and lived in them for the commanded eight days.   They had not done this since the days of Joshua and they celebrated Sukkot with great joy.  They also read the Torah every day from the first day until the last day of the ‘appointed time.’

In Our Day

The Feast of  Trumpets begins on the first day of the seventh month and Sukkot begins on the fourteenth day. On our Gregorian calendar, these fall festivals occur in our months of September/October.   They are a vision of the coming Kingdom of God when Israel, the natural branches of the Olive Tree will gather in Jerusalem along with the nations, the wild branches of the Olive Tree, to worship the King of Kings.  Everyone will wave olive, palm, and myrtle branches for they will not just study Torah, they will bear the righteous fruit of the etrog.

The Jews in the days of Nehemiah prepared for this coming Kingdom by repenting and returning to the Torah of God and celebrated the ‘appointed times’ on their commanded days.  As wild olives, we can also embrace the vision of the coming Kingdom millennia later in the say way: repenting and turning back to God, learning Torah,  and proclaiming the ‘appointed times’ to those who stand by the Water Gate desiring spiritual nourishment from the spring of living water.  Amen. “Yeshua is the faithful King.”  

©2016 Tentstake Ministries Publishing, all rights reserved.  No copying or reproducing of this article without crediting the author or Tentstake Ministries Publishing. 

Hebrews 6 – Elementary Teachings

“Therefore, leaving behind the initial lessons about the Messiah, let us go on to maturity, not laying again the foundation of turning from works that lead to death, trusting God, and instruction about washings, s’mikhah, the resurrection of the dead and eternal punishment. And, God willing, this is what we will do” (Hebrews 6:1-3, Complete Jewish Bible).  

Sin that Leads to Death

“The wages of sin is death” (Romans 6:23).

Sin is defined in 1 John 3:4 as breaking the commands of God.  Yeshua refers to this lawlessness as living contrary to Torah, his Father’s instructions for living in this world and preparing for the coming Kingdom (Matthew 7:23, Luke 13:27).  The consequence for sin is eternal spiritual death.  This was the result of Adam’s sin in the Garden and as his offspring, the consequence of our own sin.

After Yeshua was tested in the wilderness by the Adversary, he went back to the Galilee to live in Capernaum and began preaching the gospel, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand” (Matthew 4:17). In Hebrew, ‘repentance’ is teshuvah and means ‘to return to God.’   By repenting from sin’s lawless deeds, we turn away from actions that lead to spiritual death and return to God and His ways (Luke 5:31-32).

This basic gospel message is considered one of the elementary teachings. This is the gospel message preached by Peter on Shavuot (Pentecost) in Jerusalem.  Sha’ul (Paul) preached the same gospel message gentiles who were putting their faith in Yeshua.

“Kefa answered them, “Turn from sin, return to God [teshuvah], and each of you be immersed on the authority of Yeshua the Messiah into forgiveness of your sins, and you will receive the gift of the Ruach HaKodesh [Holy Spirit]! For the promise is for you, for your children, and for those far away — as many as Adonai our God may call!” (Acts 2:38-39). 

“You know that I [Sha’ul] held back nothing that could be helpful to you, and that I taught you both in public and from house to house, declaring with utmost seriousness the same message to Jews and Greeks alike: turn from sin to God; and put your trust in our Lord, Yeshua the Messiah” (Acts 20:20-21)

Faith in God

“Be assured, then, that it is those who live by trusting and being faithful who are really children of Avraham” (Galatians 3:7).

Faith or emunah is defined as “being sure of what we hope for and certain of what we do not see” (Hebrews 11:1).  Our certainty of God’s existence is basic to the gospel message and considered the second elementary teaching.  

Abraham believed he was too old to have an heir, but God promised him he would have an heir.  He told him to count the stars in the sky, if he could, and his descendants would be as numerous.  “He [Abraham] believed in Adonai, and he credited it to him as righteousness” (Genesis 15:4-6).  God tested Abraham with this heir.  He was told to take his son, his only son whom he loved, to Mount Moriah and offer him on an altar.  Abraham obeyed God because he believed God could raise his son from the dead, the greatest example of his faith (Romans 4:17).  This unwavering trust in God’s promise made Abraham the ‘father of faith.’ 

Yeshua taught that those who followed him must put their faith in God, first and foremost (Mark 11:22).  They must love God, first and foremost (Matthew 22:27).   This is a foundation stone of his salvation message.  Separating faith in Yeshua from faith in his Father leaves an incomplete and misdirected faith. There can never be two gods.  Yeshua’s purpose was to glorify his Father,  to bring salvation to the world, and to show people the correct way to have a relationship with God (1 John 4:14, John 14:6, John 17:1,6,22).

During Hanukkah in Jerusalem, Yeshua states to his Jewish brothers and sisters, “I and the Father are one” (John 10:30).  In Hebrew, echad means ‘one’ in unity.  He made this statement to make sure they understood that he was not another god to be worshiped or even a separate ‘person’ from his Father. By embracing Yeshua’s relationship his Father, we can put our faith in the “visible image of the invisible God” because that is who Yeshua is (Colossians 1:15).

Once a person turns from sin, they put their faith in God, Yeshua. Sha’ul preached that repentance and faith in God is for both Jews and gentiles.

I have declared to both Jews and Greeks that they must turn to God in repentance and have faith in our Lord Yeshua”  (Acts 20:26).

Instruction about Washings

“Now before the coming of Yeshua, Yochanan [John] proclaimed to all the people of Isra’el an immersion [mikveh] in connection with turning to God from sin” (Acts 13:24).”

The Complete Jewish Bible translates ‘baptism’ as ‘instructions about washings’ or a mikveh.  mikveh is an immersion for purification and done numerous times throughout a person’s life for various reasons.  During the month of Elul (August/September) there was an immersion for the repentance of sins before the arrival of the Days of Awe and the Day of Atonement.  This repentance immersion was nothing new. When John preached repentance from sins at the Jordan River, the men and women of Israel were taking part in the repentance immersion during the month of Elul. It was at this same time that Yeshua was immersed and the Spirit of Adonai came down and rested on him like a dove (Luke 3:20-22).

When the whole house of Israel was “stung in their hearts” after hearing about Yeshua who is Lord and Messiah, they asked Peter what they should do.  He responded with the first three elementary teachings.

“Kefa [Peter] answered them, “Turn from sin, return to God, and each of you be immersed on the authority of Yeshua the Messiah into forgiveness of your sins, and you will receive the gift of the Ruach HaKodesh! For the promise is for you, for your children, and for those far away — as many as Adonai our God may call!” (Acts 2:36-39). 

After Yeshua ascended to heaven, another dimension was added to the mikveh.  The purpose for the repentance immersion was for purification, a pledge of a good conscience towards God through Yeshua’s resurrection (1 Peter 3:21). Immersion became a personal illustration of sharing in Yeshua’s death, burial, and resurrection.  The immersion became an expression of being set free from the ‘law of sin and death’ and resurrecting into a new life (Romans 6:4-5). It was an immersion into Yeshua and his resurrection.

Though there are many reasons to continue to mikveh, there is only one that expresses our faith in Yeshua. Repentance, faith in God, and teachings about mikveh lead us into the next elementary teaching.

Laying on of Hands

Do not be hasty in the laying on of  hands, and do not share in the sins of others” (1 Timothy 5:22).

Sh’mikah is the fourth elementary teaching. In Hebrew, the word sh’mikah means ‘authority’ and came through ‘laying on of hands.’  Throughout the Bible there are many examples of sh’mikah from Isaac blessing Jacob to Yeshua blessing little children (Luke 18:15-17).  One of the more significant sh’mikah is when Moshe passed his authority onto Joshua to take the Israelites into the Promised Land (Numbers 27:18-20).

One spiritual aspect of sh’mikah is physical healing through the forgiveness of sins.  Yeshua had the authority to forgive sins, and soon after his resurrection, Yeshua passed this authority onto his disciples by breathing on him.   If they forgave an individual’s sins, their sins were forgiven.  If they didn’t, the sins remained on the person (John 20:20-23).

Yeshua gave his disciples the authority to release men and women from the bondage of guilt. To hear Your sins are forgiven” releases anger, bitterness, guilt, and removes the stronghold of the Adversary. Once those deeply-rooted issues were removed, physical healing could begin (Matthew 9:5-6).   The authority that Yeshua gave to the apostles was so powerful that even their shadows healed the sick and set free the demon possessed (Acts 5:15-16).

After Yeshua ascended to his Father, the power and authority of the Ruach HaKodesh was received through laying on of hands (Acts 8:15-17).   Believers in Yeshua rejoiced when they received this power and it was so great that even ‘unsaved’ men desired. They offered the apostles money to have the power because it resulted in healing they could use to become rich (Acts 8:18-19).

Sha’ul warns Timothy about laying hands too quickly on an individual because there is always the potential of distorting the sh’mikah given to the apostles by Yeshua.  He also conveys the idea that when there is sh’imikah for forgiveness of sin, there is the danger the sins of one person being placed upon another.

Resurrection of the Dead

Resurrection of the dead is the sixth elementary teaching.  Resurrection, like mikveh, was not a new concept. Isaiah prophesied about the resurrection: “Your dead will live, my corpses will rise; awake and sing, you who dwell in the dust; for your dew is like the morning dew, and the earth will bring the ghosts to life” (Isaiah 26:19). Daniel also prophesied about those who would ‘awaken’ to eternal life or shame:  “Many of those sleeping in the dust of the earth will awaken, some to everlasting life and some to everlasting shame and abhorrence” (Daniel 12:2). 

The prophets Elijah and Elisha raised people from the dead (1 Kings 17:17-22, 2 Kings 4:32-35, 2 Kings 13:20-21).  Yeshua raised the widow’s son from the dead and the daughter of the synagogue leader (Luke 7:11-15, Luke 8:41-42, 49-55).  Peter raised Dorcas from the dead; Sha’ul raised Eutychus (Acts 9:36-41, Acts 20:9-10).

When Lazarus died, his sister Martha believed that she would see him again in the resurrection at the ‘last day’ in the Messianic Era.  She also knew that she stood in the presence of the Messiah and her faith in Yeshua brought her brother back to life (John 11:24-26). Many holy people were brought out of their tombs by the same power of God (Matthew 27:50-53).

This elementary teaching about the resurrection was not embraced by everyone in Israel.  The Pharisees believed in the eternal soul and a resurrection of the dead; the Sadducees did not.  This is the reason they tested Yeshua about Levirate marriage and the seven brothers who married the same woman. Whose wife she would be in the resurrection? (Luke 20:27-30). Peter and John irritated the Sadducees by using Yeshua as proof of the resurrection of the dead (Acts 4:1-2). Sha’ul claimed his religious affiliation with the Pharisees and their view of the resurrection (Acts 23:6).

According to the book of Revelation, there are two resurrections.  Those who take part in the first resurrection will reign with Yeshua as priests of God during the Messianic Era (Revelation 20:6-7).   The second death will have no power over these saints; they will have already entered eternal life.  The second resurrection is of all people from the beginning of time who have died. As the prophet Daniel said, some will rise to eternal life, others to eternal death.

“But if it is preached that Messiah has been raised from  the dead, how can some of you say that there is no resurrection of the dead? If there is no resurrection of the dead, then not even Messiah has been raised.  And if Messiah has not been raised our preaching is useless and so is your faith” (1 Corinthians 15:12-14).

Eternal Punishment

As Sha’ul discoursed on righteousness, self-control and the judgment to come, Felix was afraid and said, ‘That’s enough for now!” (Acts 24:25)

Eternal punishment is the seventh elementary teaching. In the days of Noah, the heavens and earth were judged by water; wicked and ungodly men were destroyed in the flood.  This present heaven and earth will be judged by fire destroying wicked and ungodly men (2 Peter 3:7).

“Just as the weeds are collected and burned up in the fire, so will it be at the end of the age” (Matthew 13:40).

The godless will experience spiritual death or eternal separation from God.  On the Day of Judgment, books will be opened and everyone will be judged by their works.  Some will find their name has been blotted out of the book of life and are no longer listed with the righteous (Psalm 69:28).  Anyone’s name that is not found written in the book of life will be thrown into the lake of fire along with the Adversary, the beast, the false prophet and even Jezebel (Revelation 20:11-15).

There is also an eternal judgment for some who received eternal life, but lived contrary to God’s commands.  They remain in the outer darkness, outside the gates of the New Jerusalem, where there is weeping and gnashing of teeth (Matthew 8:12, Luke 13:28).  Gnashing of teeth implies these people knew the Truth, heard the Truth, but chose not to obey the Truth. They have escaped the lake of fire as through flames. They do not lose their free gift of eternal life, but lose entrance to the Kingdom (Revelation 22:15).

In the days of Yeshua, gentiles were referred to as ‘dogs’ (Matthew 7:6, 15:26).  Though many gentiles receive salvation through Yeshua, they refuse to repent from pagan traditions and idolatry based on lies and deception. ‘Evildoers’ and ‘workers of lawlessness’ are those who disobey Torah or teach others to disobey ‘the law.’   These people will be least in the Kingdom according to Yeshua: Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord!’ will enter the Kingdom of Heaven, only those who do what my Father in heaven wants. On that Day [of Judgment], many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord! Didn’t we prophesy in your name? Didn’t we expel demons in your name? Didn’t we perform many miracles in your name?’ Then I will tell them to their faces, ‘I never knew you! Get away from me, you workers of lawlessness!'”  (Matthew 7:21-23).

 “If anyone hears what I am saying and does not observe it, I don’t judge him; for I did not come to judge the world, but to save the world. Those who reject me and don’t accept what I say have a judge — the word which I have spoken will judge them on the Last Day [of Judgment]” (John 12:47-48)

These are the elementary teachings: repentance, faith in God, mikveh, laying on of hands, resurrection of the dead and eternal punishment. We are to leave behind these the teachings so that we can go on to maturity.

©2005 Tentstake Ministries Publishing, all rights reserved.  No copying or reproducing of this article without crediting the author or Tentstake Ministries Publishing.