Posts Tagged ‘Hanukkah’

Praise – Hebrew: Hallel

הלל

The Hebrew word hallel means ‘to boast,’ ‘celebrate’ and ‘shine.’ The word is found 165 times in Scripture. The word ‘halleluyah’ comes from hallel and means ‘Praise Yah.’ Psalms chapters 113 to 118 are known as ‘The Hallel.’ These Psalms were sung as prayers by worshipers climbing the steps to the Temple to worship Adonai during the three festival gatherings: Pesach, Shavuot, Sukkot and Hanukkah.

“Let them hallel the name of Adonai, for he commanded and they were created” (Psalm 148:2-5).

“Let them hallel his name with dancing, make melody to him with tambourine and lyre …” (Psalm 149:3).

“The poor will eat and be satisfied; those who seek Adonai will hallel him; Your hearts will enjoy life forever” (Psalm 22:26).

“Charm can lie, beauty can vanish, but a woman who fears Adonai should be hallel” (Proverbs 31:30).

Hebrew Word Pictures

praise – hallel – הלל

ה Hey – A Window means ‘reveal’ or ‘behold.’

ל Lamed – A Shepherd’s Staff means ‘urge forward.’

ל Lamed – A Shepherd’s Staff means ‘urge forward.’

The Hebrew Word Picture for hallel: behold and urge forward, urge forward.

©2022 Tentstake Ministries Publishing

Isaiah 60:22 – Growing A Multitude

“The smallest will grow to a thousand, the weakest will become a mighty nation. I, Adonai, when the right time comes, will quickly bring it about.

The Hebrew word for ‘smallest’ is katan and means ‘small, young or unimportant.’ It also has the nuance of ‘weak’ and ‘insignificant.’

The Hebrew word for ‘thousand’ is alef. This is the first letter of the Hebrew alef-bet and stands for the number 1000. In Hebrew letters pictures this letter is an Ox and means ‘first’ and ‘strength.’

The Hebrew word for ‘weakest’ is tzair and means ‘smallest, youngest, most insignificant.’ It also means ‘few’ in number.

The Hebrew word for ‘mighty’ is atzum and means ‘mighty and numerous.’ It is also used for King David’s special forces known as the ‘mighty men.’

Adonai is the representation for the memorial name that God gave to Moshe at the burning bush in Exodus 3:15-16: yod-hey-vav-hey, Ehyeh Asher Ehyeh, I Am.

The Hebrew word for ‘time’ is eth and means ‘in its time.’ The ‘right time’ according to the Amplified Version is ‘appointed time’ suggesting there’s an ‘appointed time’ for when God quickly takes action. Hanukkah, the memorial to the cleansing and re-dedication of the Temple in Jerusalem, is all about a few have victory over the multitude.

The Hebrew word for for ‘quicken’ is chush and means ‘to hasten,’ ‘to be eager with excitement,’ and to ‘come quickly.’

The weak and insignificant will grow strong like an ox, the smallest and most insignificant will become a numerous nation. I, Yahweh, when the ‘appointed times’ comes, will come quickly and bring it about.

©2020 Tentstake Ministries Publishing, all rights reserved.  No copying or reproducing of this article without crediting the author or Tentstake Ministries Publishing.

Yeshua in His Father’s Feasts

Yeshua in His Father’s Feasts is a personal or group in-depth study guide/student manual that reveals the shadows and realities of the Messiah in the prophetic visions in the Feasts of the LORD. It will fill in the holes of your Bible when reading the words ‘Jewish feast’ or ‘the feast of the Jews.’  This study will illuminate often-overlooked phrases and idioms that allude to the ‘appointed times’ of God.

Both the prophet Micah and King Solomon state that without prophetic vision and knowledge, God’s people perish. Studying the Biblical holy days will revive the searching soul and bring insight and understanding into the complete salvation found in Yeshua – his past, present, and future work.

This newly revised study guide/student manual includes Scriptures from the Torah, Prophets, Psalms, Gospels, and Letters. It includes activities for families and children that will enhance celebrating the Biblical ‘appointed times’ as well as suggestions for digging deeper into traditional and Biblical Jewish customs surrounding Yeshua In His Father’s Feasts.

If you are doing a group study, a leader’s manual for the revised second edition student manual can be purchased that not only has the answers to the questions, but also ideas for spurring discussions.

May be purchased on amazon.com

Reviews:

“This is the best Bible study I have ever done. I can’t seem to put it down and I am learning more and more about my faith everyday. I have been a believer for 60 years and I am learning truths I was never taught in church. I even asked my pastor if he knew all of this and admitted, he did not.” (M. Graves)

“I have been growing in my faith from reading and studying the Feasts in this guide. Thank you for your faithfulness to Yeshua!” (S. Corben)

“Few Christians understand that the context for the Jewish Messiah of the New Testament of their Bibles is the culture and language and history of the nation of Israel. This book helps explain why that culture, language and history is necessary knowledge for understanding the identity of the Messiah and how knowing the Jewish Messiah enlarges the understanding of the Biblical feasts. Good, basic foundational information from which to launch further study. Very enjoyable and eye-opening.” (W. Lopez)

“Loved it. Will keep going back for future Wisdom that truly matters.” (J. Banta)

“I have learned so many things about the Bible that I never saw before. I loved learning about the fall festivals and I became aware of more and more people teaching about these special times. I especially learned that Christmas and Hanukkah are very different holidays. I am grateful to have done this Bible study.” (L. Herbert)

“My eyes are seeing so much more in Scripture, especially the new testament, after doing this study.” (M. Gravenhorst)

Hanukkah Word: Hammer

The dictionary defines a ‘hammer’ as “a tool with a heavy metal head mounted at right angles at the end of a handle, used for jobs such as breaking things and driving in nails.”

The noun ‘hammer’ is found only a few times in Scripture. The first time is when Ya’el, the wife of Heber, uses a hammer to pound a tent stake into the head of Sisra piercing his skull and crushing his temple (Judges 4:21). With this act, she sets Israel free from God’s judgment for worshiping idols. The second time it is used when Solomon built the Temple. That stones were prepared at the quarry so that no ‘hammer’ could be heard while it was being built (1 Kings 6:7).

Though King David lived long before the Maccabean Revolt, but he reveals how the sanctuary of Adoni was destroyed when Israel was taken captive for worshiping idols. ‘Hammers’ were used by the enemies of God’s people to destroy the Temple, specifically to smash the intricately carved woodwork (Psalm 74:6).

The Word of God is like a ‘hammer’ that shatters rocks and changes the heart of stone into a heart of flesh. He breaks the rock-hard heart so it will obey His commandments (Jeremiah 23:28-29).

The Hebrew word for ‘hammer’ is maqqebeth or ‘Maccabee.’ The leader of the Jewish revolt against the Syrian armies of Alexander the Great was called Judah ‘Maccabee’ or ‘The Hammer.’ As a small army of ‘hammers,’ the Maccabees fought against the brutal and overpowering armies of Alexander the Great who wanted to Hellinize the Jewish people.

Judah and his ‘hammer’ rebels fought for their freedom to worship the God of Israel. With faith in the ‘Word’ of Elohim, and the help of the ‘Commander of Elohim’s Armies,’ they ‘hammered’ against their enemies for four years until they regained control of the Temple in Jerusalem re-dedicated it back to God.

As ‘hammers’ were used to destroy the Temple, ‘The Hammer’ was used to restore its glory.

©2019 Tentstake Ministries Publishing, all rights reserved.  No copying or reproducing of this article without crediting the author or Tentstake Ministries Publishing.