Posts Tagged ‘Daughter of Tziyon’

The Woman, Blood and the Risen Lamb

Within the apostolic books, Matthew, Mark and Luke each write from their unique perspective about the woman and the issue of bleeding. Each one adds details to the event creating a full picture of what happened to the woman.

“A woman who had had a hemorrhage for twelve years approached him from behind and touched the tzitzit on his robe. For she said to herself, “If I can only touch his robe, I will be healed.” Yeshua turned, saw her and said, “Courage, daughter! Your trust has healed you.” And she was instantly healed” (Matthew 9:20-22).

“As he went, with the crowds on every side virtually choking him, a woman who had had a hemorrhage for twelve years, and could not be healed by anyone, came up behind him and touched the tzitzit on his robe; instantly her hemorrhaging stopped. Yeshua asked, “Who touched me?” When they all denied doing it, Kefa said, “Rabbi! The crowds are hemming you in and jostling you!” But Yeshua said, “Someone did touch me, because I felt power go out of me.” Seeing she could not escape notice, the woman, quaking with fear, threw herself down before him and confessed in front of everyone why she had touched him and how she had been instantly healed. He said to her, “My daughter, your trust has saved you; go in peace” (Luke 8:43-48).

“Among them was a woman who had had a hemorrhage for twelve years and had suffered a great deal under many physicians. She had spent her life savings; yet instead of improving, she had grown worse. She had heard about Yeshua, so she came up behind him in the crowd and touched his robe; for she said, “If I touch even his clothes, I will be healed.” Instantly the hemorrhaging stopped, and she felt in her body that she had been healed from the disease. At the same time, Yeshua, aware that power had gone out from him, turned around in the crowd and asked, “Who touched my clothes?”  His talmidim responded, “You see the people pressing in on you; and still you ask, ‘Who touched me?’” But he kept looking around to see who had done it. The woman, frightened and trembling, because she knew what had happened to her, came and fell down in front of him and told him the whole truth. “Daughter,” he said to her, “your trust has healed you. Go in peace, and be healed of your disease” (Mark 5:25-34).

None of the accounts describe the woman: her name, her age, her marital status, or whether she had children because those details were of no consequence to the event. Matthew writes that she had a hemorrhage for 12 years and touched Yeshua’s tzizit in order to be healed. Mark adds that she had seen many physicians and spent all of her money, but never got any better. Luke, a doctor, says that she could not be healed by anyone.

Her only hope was touching the Messiah’s tzizit, his garment. According to Luke, the woman felt her body healed the moment she touched him. Yeshua called her out from among the crowd because he felt power leave him. In front of everyone, he called her a ‘courageous daughter’ and told her that her faith healed her.

Touching the Unclean

According to Leviticus 15:19-25, every woman was unclean during her time of niddah (menstruating) or other flow of blood. Unclean meant ‘ceremonially impure’ and the normal state of niddah lasted seven days. Whoever, especially a man, touched the woman would be ritually impure until evening or the beginning of the next day. Everything she laid or sat on also became ritually impure. Anyone touching these things would be ritually impure until evening after ‘he’ washed his clothes and bathed in water. If a man had sexual relations with a woman during her time of niddah, he would also become ritually impure for seven days. If a woman had a discharge of blood for many days (weeks or years) that is not considered her monthly niddah, she would be ritually impure throughout the entire time of the blood flow.

It is not clear from Scripture whether this woman had female friends who touched her, but according to Leviticus, no man could touch her. For her to push herself into a crowd of men (and women) to touch Yeshua would have been contrary to Levitical law and she could receive severe reprocussions.

When Yeshua called her out, she had already been healed, but still trembled with fear. She had no idea the consequences that Yeshua would put on her even though she knew she was immediately healed. She fell down at Yeshua’s feet and told him the entire truth of what had happened. Mark writes that Yeshua called her ‘Daughter,’ and that she should go in shalom and be healed of her disease. This suggests there was more to her illness than just a hemorrhage. From living a life of isolation for 12 years, she also needed emotional and even psychological healing. By bringing her into public view, he could make her healing complete. No one would doubt her healing and she could re-enter society as a healthy restored woman.

Talit and Tzizit

“Adonai said to Moshe,“Speak to the people of Isra’el, instructing them to make, through all their generations, tzitziyot on the corners of their garments, and to put with the tzitzit on each corner a blue thread. It is to be a tzitzit for you to look at and thereby remember all of Adonai’s mitzvot and obey them, so that you won’t go around wherever your own heart and eyes lead you to prostitute yourselves;but it will help you remember and obey all my mitzvot and be holy for your God.I am Adonai your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt in order to be your God. I am Adonai your God” (Numbers 15:37-41, Deuteronomy 22:12).

The tzitzit, commanded by Elohim, were meant to remind Isra’el to faithfully follow Elohim by obeying His commandments.  In the tzizit, there was to be a blue or techelet thread. The blue thread was made from the secretion of a small snail that has either become extinct or is unknown today. Because of this, having a blue thread is considered by some Orthodox Jews as wrong while others say that Elohim commanded a blue thread and therefore must include a blue thread.

In Ashkenazi (Russian/Ukranian Jewish) tzizit custom, there are four sections of winding the threads with knots which comes to a total of 39. This number relates to the numerical equivalent of the words: “The LORD is One (Echad)” which comes from the Shema in Deuteronomy 6:4.  In the Sephardic custom (Jews from the the Iberian Peninsula which includes Spain and Portugal and those who eventually settled in South America, a combination of 26 windings and knots is used to spell the numerical value of the Tetragrammaton yod-hey-vav-hey or the “I Am that I Am,” Ehyeh Asher Ehyeh.  

Orthodox and some Conservative Jews wear a talit katan or a type of under garment with the tzizit hanging from the four corners in order to fulfill the command.  Most other Jews today use a talit or prayer shawl with the tzizit on the four corners.

The Greek word for ‘hem’ in the gospel verses with the woman with the issue of bleeding is kraspedon meaning ‘a tassel of twisted wool.’  In Numbers 15:38, the word translated ‘border’ or ‘corner’ is the Hebrew word kanaph. This word means ‘wings’ and is used 76 times in the Biblical text.  Kanaph is used in Malachi 3:20 (4:2) that describes the ‘sun of righteousness’ that rises with ‘healing in its wings.’ For this reason, the corners of the garment with the tzizit are often called ‘wings.’

“But to you who fear my name, the sun of righteousness will rise with healing in its wings; and you will break out leaping, like calves released from the stall” (Malachi 3:20, 4:2).

This verse in Malachi was also understood as representing the Messiah who would ‘come with healing in his wings.’  When raising his arms with the tzizit on the four corners of his garment, it would appear as if he had ‘wings.’ As a Jewish woman, the woman with the hemorrhage would have known about this verse from the prophet Malachi. Through faith as one who ‘feared the name of the LORD’ and believed Yeshua was the promised Messiah, she reached out and touched his tzizit.

Daughter of Tziyon

Yeshua called the woman ‘Daughter,’ however, in reality, this woman was his ‘sister’ as she was Jewish. Calling her ‘Daughter’ refers to ‘Daughter of Tziyon’ which is an endearing term used for Isra’el and Jerusalem. Jeremiah 6:2 says that the ‘daughter of Tziyon is beautiful and delicate.’ Yeshua is perhaps using this term to allude to the the physical nature of this woman: beautiful and delicate. Yeshua speaks a prophetic word over this woman as Mount Tziyon is where the faithful ‘daughters’ will gather when Yeshua rules as King in Jerusalem over all the earth. Publicly, he not only declares this woman healed and acceptable to the community, but she is commended as one of the faithful who will have a place in his coming Kingdom.

“Rejoice with all your heart, daughter of Tziyon! Shout out loud, daughter of Yerushalayim! Look! Your king is coming to you. He is righteous, and he is victorious. Yet he is humble — he’s riding on a donkey, yes, on a lowly donkey’s colt” (Zechariah 9:9).

Adonai has proclaimed to the end of the earth, “Say to the daughter of Tziyon, ‘Here, your Salvation [Yeshua]  is coming! Here, his reward is with him, and his recompense is before him‘” (Isaiah 62:11).

“Sing, daughter of Tziyon! Shout, Isra’el! Be glad and rejoice with all your heart, daughter of Yerushalayim!” (Zephaniah 3:14)

Though this woman waited 12 years to be healed from her issue of blood, as a woman in Isra’el, she had waited millennia to see and ‘touch’ the One who would bring the restoration of Isra’el and the liberation of Jerusalem.  Through her healing, Yeshua confirmed to the crowd that healing was also coming to Jerusalem, Isra’el and the nations.  

The Nations

Zechariah prophesies that in the last days many from the nations will come to Jerusalem to ask the favor of Elohim.   Ten men speaking the languages of the nations will grab hold of the tzizit of one Jew because they will suddenly understand that Elohim is with His chosen people. It will be an awakening to the reality that ‘salvation does come from the Jews’ and those of the nations who wish to know that ‘salvation’ will to cling to the Jewish people. This is a significant event because over the centuries church doctrines have taught that Jews must convert to a religion called Christianity while Scripture teaches that non-Jews will embrace the Jewish people to understand their own faith.

“Yes, many peoples and powerful nations will come to consult Adonai-Tzva’ot in Yerushalayim and to ask Adonai’s favor.’ Adonai-Tzva’ot says, ‘When that time comes, ten men will take hold — speaking all the languages of the nations — will grab hold of the cloak of a Jew and say, “We want to go with you, because we have heard that God is with you” (Zechariah 8:22-23).

The Number 12

Hebrew Word Picture

Hebrew numbers are written with Hebrew letters. The number 12 is written with the yod and the bet.

Yod is a closed hand and means ‘finished work’

Bet is a house and means ‘house,

The number 12 means in Hebrew word pictures: ‘finished work of the house.

The number 12 in Scripture symbolizes Elohim’s power and authority. This power is evident in Yeshua healing the woman and publicly declaring his divinity through his power to heal; he is the Rafa’el, the Healer.

The number 12 also symbolizes completeness. There are 12 Tribes of Israel, 12 stones in the High Priest’s breastplate representing those tribes, 12 loaves of the Bread of Presence in the Temple for the priests. Twelve spies searched out the Promised Land. Yeshua was 12 years old when he taught at the temple, he had 12 disciples, and collected 12 baskets of bread and fish after feeding five thousand. The New Jerusalem has 12 gates, 12 foundations, and one tree of life bearing 12 different fruits. The woman with the issue of blood was completely healed and Yeshua raised a little girl 12 years of age from the dead.

The Raising of the Little Girl

Again each of the writers of the gospels give a different perspective of the raising of the little girl. Jairus was a leader in the synagogue. His daughter was 12 years old and dying. He comes to Yeshua and asks that he ‘lay hands on her.’ This word in Hebrew is shmikah and references a sacrifice in the Temple. When an animal was sacrificed the offerer laid hands on the offering in order to transfer the sins from the person to the animal. It would seem that Jairus had an understanding that by laying hands on his daughter the ‘Giver of Life’ could impart the ‘breath of life’ through shmikah. He had great faith.

“When Yeshua arrived at the official’s house and saw the flute-players, and the crowd in an uproar,  he said, “Everybody out! The girl isn’t dead, she’s only sleeping!” And they jeered at him. But after the people had been put outside, he entered and took hold of the girl’s hand, and she got up. News of this spread through all that region” (Matthew 9:23-26).

Matthew’s account has Yeshua demanding everyone leave. Once they are gone, he goes into the girl, takes her hand and she gets up. News of this event spread through all that region.

“While he was still speaking, people from the synagogue official’s house came, saying, “Your daughter has died. Why bother the rabbi any longer?” Ignoring what they had said, Yeshua told the synagogue official, “Don’t be afraid, just keep trusting.” He let no one follow him except Kefa, Ya‘akov and Yochanan, Ya‘akov’s brother. When they came to the synagogue official’s house, he found a great commotion, with people weeping and wailing loudly. On entering, he said to them, “Why all this commotion and weeping? The child isn’t dead, she’s just asleep!” And they jeered at him. But he put them all outside, took the child’s father and mother and those with him, and went in where the child was. Taking her by the hand, he said to her, “Talita, kumi!” (which means, “Little girl, I say to you, get up!”). At once the girl got up and began walking around; she was twelve years old. Everybody was utterly amazed. He gave them strict orders to say nothing about this to anyone, and told them to give her something to eat” (Mark 5:35-43).

Mark’s account goes into greater detail. The little girl is no longer dying, she is dead. Only Kefa (Peter) and Yochanan (John) are allowed to go with Yeshua. While the crowd is in an uproar outside the house in Matthew’s account, the people are wailing and mourning loudly in Mark’s. As with all three accounts, Yeshua tells everyone she is not dead, only sleeping.

He takes Kefa, Yochanan, the girl’s mother and father and goes into the room. He says, Talitha kumi. Though most Bibles translate this ‘little girl rise,’ in the Hebrew it may have two other meanings. Talia means ‘little lamb.’ After healing the woman who is a ‘Daughter of Tziyon,’ this ‘daughter’ could be a reference to the little lambs of Isra’el or the ‘children of Isra’el.’

“Like a shepherd He will tend His flock, In His arm He will gather the lambs, And carry them in His bosom; He will gently lead the nursing ewes.” 

The other meaning for Talitha kumi is ‘rise to my talit.’ Once again Yeshua uses his talit, his tzizit for a miraculous restoration to life. This concept of the tzizit is found even to Mark 6:36 when “They begged him to let them touch even the tzizit on his robe, and all who touched it were healed.” 

“While Yeshua was still speaking, a man came from the synagogue president’s house. “Your daughter has died,” he said. “Don’t bother the rabbi any more.” But on hearing this, Yeshua answered him, “Don’t be afraid! Just go on trusting, and she will be made well.” When he arrived at the house, he didn’t allow anyone to go in with him except Kefa, Yochanan, Ya‘akov and the child’s father and mother All the people were wailing and mourning for her; but he said, “Don’t weep; she hasn’t died, she’s sleeping.” They jeered at him, since they knew she had died. But he took her by the hand, called out, “Little girl, get up!” and her spirit returned. She stood up at once, and he directed that something be given her to eat. Her parents were astounded, but he instructed them to tell no one what had happened” (Luke 8:49-56).

Luke is a doctor. In neither account of the woman with the issue of blood or the little girl is Dr. Luke consulted. I personally believe this is because Yeshua wants us to come to him first and foremost. Before going to every doctor and spending every cent for medical advice and treatment, it is important to go to the Healer. Many diseases have spiritual roots and can only truly be healed by the Rafa’el. I personally believe the woman with the issue of bleeding had deeper rooted spiritual issues that needed more than touching Yeshua’s tzizit. She needed to be told she was healed and called a ‘Daughter’ for complete healing body, soul and spirit.

In Luke’s account, Yeshua reminds Jairus not to be afraid when he hears his daughter has died. Part of the process of restoration will be the father’s faith overcoming his fears. Ya’akov (James) is also present for the event along with Kefa, Yochanan, and the girl’s parents. In each account, the group of people at the house ‘jeer’ at Yeshua. This word hitah means to scoff, sneer, and ridicule. The people at Jairus’ home were scoffing and ridiculing Yeshua. This is another reason why Yeshua told Jairus to have faith!

In Luke’s account Yeshua takes the girl’s hand and tells her to ‘get up.’ Her ‘spirit’ returned to her. This word is ruach and is the ‘spirit’ that Elohim placed in Adam at creation. It is the ‘breath of life.’ Her parents were astonished, though Jairus had asked for this very thing! They were told not to tell anyone what had happened, however, according to Matthew, word spread around the region.

Consolation of Isra’el

With the events surrounding the woman with the issue of bleeding and the little girl rising to Messiah’s tzizit, the Jewish people were seeing the beginning of the redemption of Isra’el. They were being shown great signs from from the Messiah that their time of cleansing from evil deeds and blood-covered hands was nearing (Isaiah 1:15-16, Isaiah 59:3).

While the woman with the issue of bleeding was a prophetic picture of the Daughter of Tzyion because of her great faith; the little girl pre-shadowed the lamb who would die and be resurrected from the dead. The healing of the land of Isra’el, their nation, and the Jewish people was upon them in the Lamb of God who would restore the “Daughter of Tzyion.”

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