Posts Tagged ‘‘man of lawlessness’ Maccabees’

Hanukkah Word: Assimilation

“Many peoples will go and say, “Come, let’s go up to the mountain of the LORD, to the house of the God of Jacob! He will teach us about his ways, and we will walk in his paths.” For out of Tziyon will go forth Torah, the word of Adonai from Jerusalem” (Isaiah 2:3).

Watching a documentary last night on the history of Hanukkah, it became so clear that the Jewish people did not want to assimilate into the Greek Hellenistic culture being forced upon them and lose their identity, their Biblical calling as the people of God and a light to the nations. My husband and I talked about how we had to come out of Rome and leave behind all the doctrines of Roman catholicism that the evangelical/protestant church has embraced. It was difficult leaving behind cherished family traditions that were actually contrary to the Word of God. Sometimes it felt as difficult as the rag tag Jewish army fighting the great and mighty Syrian military on elephants. Our families didn’t understand; moreover, our church brothers and sisters denounced us as legalists fallen from grace. Some said we even ‘left the fellowship of God’!

The documentary stated that the 4-year battle was more than a fight to regain the Temple in Jerusalem and the ordinances given by God of Sabbath and circumcision in the Torah, it was a battle for the existence of the state of Israel. Without an Israel, there could never have been the birth of the Messiah, Yeshua. Without an Israel today, there can never be his return. The battle still rages.

As we watched the documentary, we could see how Christiandom, by negating the history of the Jewish people from their canon of Scriptures, have lost the understanding of what Yeshua/Jesus meant when he spoke of the ‘abomination of desolation’ and the ‘man of lawlessness’ that is at work already in this world. They create their own prophetic western perspective rather than seeingNo automatic alt text available. that he was referring to the days before Hanukkah and the battle of assimilating into a world religious system that is contrary to the Hebrew Scriptures. It is much easier to assimilate and give rationalizations for assimilating into the culture around us and its expressed idolatry than to stand as Mattathias did against the Syrian generals who wanted him to sacrifice to a false god with a pig or to fight as the Maccabees did with few weapons, or to follow the Lion of Judah.